Discover Central Georgia: Museum of Aviation

The museum opened to the public in 1984 with 20 aircraft all in the open field. It is now the second largest museum in the United States Air Force and the fourth most visited museum in the Department of Defense.
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The Museum of Aviation hosts the first STEM City Expo
STEM City Expo

WARNER ROBINS, Ga. (41NBC/WMGT) – The Museum of Aviation is located adjacent to Robins Air Force Base.

It is a large outdoor complex with several hangar-style buildings and more than 80 aircraft.

The museum opened to the public in 1984 with 20 aircraft all in the open field. It is now the second largest museum in the United States Air Force and the fourth most visited museum in the Department of Defense.

“We’re a field museum of the United States Air Force National Museum, so technically all of our property belongs to the National Museum, and we’re kind of hidden under it,” explained Collections Manager Erin Tapp. “All of our property is historical property, but it’s Air Force property, so we manage it very carefully.”

The museum’s current collection is based on aircraft and objects that were part of the history of Robins Air Force Base.

When not on display, the artifacts are sent to a storage facility designed to protect and preserve them throughout the objects’ residency. Tapp expressed that each object has its own needs when conserved.

“It’s interesting, we don’t think of objects as living, but they are living organic things, and even non-organic materials will show different levels of wear and tear over time, and that wear and tear is simply the object growing and changing over time changed,” Tapp said.

In addition to teaching the history of Robins Air Force Base, the museum is also heavily involved in STEM-based learning, providing opportunities for children from Pre-K through 12th grade.

Elizabeth Skinner is the ACE Lead Instructor for the National STEM Academy. She has worked with STEM for the museum for 17 years and says her programs help provide a different experience for students outside of the classroom.

“The education department has been around for a long time, and it’s grown over the years,” she said. “We’re working really hard to offer STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math)-related field trips, so it really builds on the curriculum that the teachers are already teaching in the classroom.”

The museum is constantly hosting new events and fundraisers, from the annual model train show to the upcoming Festival of Trees in December, but none of these events would be possible without the help of volunteers.

The museum’s communications coordinator, Lacey Meador, thanked the volunteers.

“We count on our volunteers so much,” she said. “They are so important to the running of the museum. They are the ones who have the stories to tell. So if you are a visitor and you are coming to our campus, please come and talk to our little volunteers in red vests who are sitting at the desks.”

Whether you are interested in aviation history or want to learn something new about the world of science, the Museum of Aviation offers free admission and is ready to share its knowledge.

Click here to visit the museum’s website.

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