The cost of keeping roads clear in NH is increasing

As winter weather hits New Hampshire, highway authorities expect to pay more to keep the roads clear this year. After snow and rain fell in New Hampshire Wednesday morning, the afternoon was relatively quiet at the Department of Transportation’s operations center. It wasn’t as bad as we expected, but we were out there this morning and ready for it,” said Richard Arcand of the DOT. Arcand said the department, while prepared, is tracking rising fuel consumption and salt costs. “If we have to go to the legislature to ask for more money, we will,” he told Platz in this year’s budget. “You don’t know where the increases are going or what the economy is going to look like from year to year,” he said. State officials said they’re also facing a shortage of drivers and are offering on-the-job training to help drivers get commercial licenses. “But the city is starting to break down, can we get them back on the road quickly?” and the state said that whatever the challenges, storm after storm all season the plows will be in action and ready to go, so we’ll definitely be able to pull it off,” Beattie said. The DOT provides real-time updates on road conditions on its website.

As winter weather hits New Hampshire, highway authorities expect to pay more to keep the roads clear this year.

After snow and rain fell in New Hampshire on Wednesday morning, the afternoon was relatively quiet at the Department of Transportation’s operations center.

“It wasn’t as bad as we expected, but we were out there this morning and ready for it,” said Richard Arcand of the DOT.

Arcand said that while prepared, the department is tracking rising fuel and salt costs.

“If we have to go to the legislature to ask for more money, we will,” he said.

The City of Laconia is also seeing cost increases, but City Manager Kirk Beattie gives some leeway in this year’s budget.

“You don’t know where the increases are going or what the economy is going to look like from year to year,” he said.

While inflation has increased costs, Beattie says Laconia is also struggling to find enough drivers. State officials said they are also facing a shortage of drivers and are offering on-the-job training to help drivers obtain commercial licenses.

Supply chain issues have raised concerns about finding replacement parts for plows and other equipment, Beattie said.

“If our vehicles break down, can we get them back on the road quickly?” he said.

But the city and state said no matter the challenges, the plows will be in action storm after storm throughout the season.

“It’s a service where we have no choice but to get our roads clean, safe and roadworthy, so we’ll definitely be able to pull it off,” said Beattie.

The DOT offers real-time road condition updates on its website.

Source