The NH Native American group wants to share traditional customs

THE SOVEREIGN ABENAKI NATION NATION. THE FIRST PEOPLE TO COME TO PRESENT NEW HAMPSHIRE ARRIVE ABOUT 11,000 YEARS AGO. THEY DIVIDED INTO BANDS OR TRIBE LIKE MANY PEOPLE YOU KNOW. AMONG THEM WERE THE PENICUIK WINNIPESAUKEE PIG SKOKIE, OSSIPEE AND KAWASAKI. A lot of people think that we don’t exist because we’re just scattered all over the place. PAUL BUNNELL IS THE ELDER AND CHIEF OF THE KAWASAKI TRADITIONAL BAND OF THE SOVEREIGN ABENAKI NATION. HE SAYS THEY CURRENTLY HAVE ABOUT 465 MEMBERS SPREAD ACROSS THE US AND CANADA. OUR TRIBE, OVER 60, 65 MEMBERS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. WE HAVE ABOUT 100 AND A MASSACHUSETTS US AND 100 IN VERMONT. THE GROUP MAKES KNOWING AND UNDERSTANDING THEIR HOME CULTURE A PRIORITY. BUT NOW SAYS THE BAND WAS NEARLY WITNESSED DECADES AGO DUE TO DISEASES AND SETTLERS ATTACKING THEM. THEN WE START COVERING THAT WE ARE INDIAN, YOU KNOW, TO SAVE OUR FAMILIES AND OUR LIVES. SO MANY PEOPLE TODAY WANT TO JOIN THE TRIBE, HAVE DIFFICULTY TRACKING THEIR FAMILY HISTORY EXACTLY WHERE THEY COME FROM. WHERE BUNNELL COMES IN. DOING WHAT I DO IS I HELP ALL APPLICANTS FIND THEIR CONNECTIONS AND MY DATABASE IS UP TO 67,000 PEOPLE AS THE BAND IS NOW GROWING. THEY HAVE BIG PLANS FOR THEIR TRIBAL COUNTRIES ON ELM STREET AND CLAREMONT. WE WILL MAKE A CULTURAL CENTER THERE. NOW WE HAVE COMPLETED THE DRIVEWAY WHILE THE CULTURAL CENTER IS COMPLETED. THEY HAVE STILL EVENTS AND CEREMONIES TAKEN ON THE COUNTRY AND THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO PARTICIPATE IN ALL. THEY ALSO PLAN A SMALL VILLAGE NATURE TRAILS. WE REVIEW WHAT GRANITE STATER SHOULD CONSIDER WHEN THINKING ABOUT NEW HAMPSHIRE NATIVE AMERICAN COMMUNITY. OH THAT. WE ARE JUST LIKE YOU. MANY OF US ARE MODERN BUT WE ARE TRYING TO KEEP OUR CULTURE AGAIN AND WE WANT TO SHARE THE CULTURE

The New Hampshire Native American group wish to share traditional customs

A Native American group in New Hampshire is working to integrate ancient customs and customs into contemporary society. The first people to come to what is now New Hampshire arrived about 11,000 years ago. They split into several bands, or tribes, as many people know them, including the Penacook, Winnipesaukee, Pequawket, Sokoki, Ossipee, and Cowasuck. “A lot of people think we don’t exist because we’re just scattered all over the place,” said Paul Bunnell, elder and leader of the Sovereign Abenaki Nation’s Ko’asek Traditional Band. Bunnell said his group has about 465 members spread across the United States and Canada. We have about 100 in Massachusetts and 100 in Vermont,” he said. The group makes it a priority to promote knowledge and understanding of their native culture. Bunnell said the band was almost wiped out due to disease and settlers attacking them. “So we started covering up that we’re Indian, you know, to save our families and our lives,” he said. Because of this, many people who want to join the tribe today have a hard time tracing their family history, including where exactly they came from. This is where Bunnell comes in. “What I do is I help all applicants find their connections and connect, and my database is currently up to 67,000 people,” he said. As the band grows, they have big plans for their tribal land on Elm Street in Claremont. “We will build a cultural center there,” he said. “Right now we’ve finished the driveway.” While the cultural center is being completed, events and ceremonies will be planned and the public invited to the site. Bunnell said a small village and nature trails are also planned. Bunnell said Granite Staters should remember a few things about the New Hampshire Native American community. “Oh that we are just like them,” he said. “A lot of us are modernized, but we’re trying to restore our culture and we want to share the culture because it’s rich.”

A Native American group in New Hampshire is working to integrate ancient customs and customs into contemporary society.

The first people to come to what is now New Hampshire arrived about 11,000 years ago. They split into several groups, or tribes, as many people know them, including the Penacook, Winnipesaukee, Pequawket, Sokoki, Ossipee, and Cowasuck.

“A lot of people think we don’t exist because we’re just scattered all over the place,” said Paul Bunnell, elder and leader of the Sovereign Abenaki Nation’s Ko’asek Traditional Band.

Bunnell said his group has about 465 members spread across the United States and Canada.

“Our tribe has about 60 to 65 members in New Hampshire, and we have about 100 in Massachusetts and 100 in Vermont,” he said.

The group makes it a priority to increase knowledge and understanding of their native culture. Bunnell said the band was almost wiped out due to disease and settlers attacking them.

“So we started covering up that we’re Indian, you know, to save our families and our lives,” he said.

Because of this, many people who want to join the tribe today find it difficult to understand their family history, including where exactly they came from. This is where Bunnell comes in.

“What I do is I help all applicants find their connections and connect, and my database is up to 67,000 people right now,” he said.

As the band grows, they have big plans for their tribal land on Elm Street in Claremont.

“We will build a cultural center there,” he said. “Right now we have the driveway ready.”

While the cultural center is being completed, rural events and celebrations will be planned and the public invited. Bunnell said a small village and nature trails are also planned.

Bunnell said Granite Staters should remember a few things about the New Hampshire Native American community.

“Oh that we are just like them,” he said. “A lot of us are modernized, but we’re trying to restore our culture and we want to share the culture because it’s rich.”

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